Search Results for: CFAA

Cybersecurity, A-Z: C is for CFAA

The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, or CFAA, is the federal “anti-hacking” statute (or sometimes referred to as a “computer trespass” statute).  In essence, the CFAA prohibits intentional unauthorized access into another computer, when such action directly accesses certain protected information or otherwise causes damage or loss.  The CFAA provides for both criminal penalties and civil causes of action.  The scope and meaning of access “without authorization”… More

Rare Massachusetts Superior Court Decision Interpreting the CFAA Takes the Narrow View Without Squarely Addressing the Broad

This is a cross-post from our sister blog, Massachusetts Noncompete Law:

Judge Peter M. Lauriat of the Massachusetts Superior Court decided late last year that an employee who takes confidential documents from her employer’s electronic document system to use in a discrimination lawsuit against her employer is not liable to the employer under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), especially when the employer knew about the lawsuit but nonetheless did not restrict the employee’s access to those documents while she was working for the employer. … More

Massachusetts Federal Court Refuses to Dismiss CFAA Claim But Permits the Defendants to Ask Again Later

In the cross-post from our Noncompete Blog, another CFAA decision is discussed.

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Echoing a new theme in the federal district court in Massachusetts, last month Chief Magistrate Judge Leo T. Sorokin refused to dismiss a Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”) claim brought against the former CEO of a company, but did so without prejudice, meaning that the defendants could ask the Court to dismiss the claim again later in the case.… More

Data Scraping, at Home and Abroad

Data scraping is a technique where information on one platform is exported onto another.  The practice is widespread and is used for all sort of reasons, like market analysis or advertising.  The kind of information located and extracted is as varied as the kind of information that exists on the internet–which is to say, anything and everything–but where it becomes particularly interesting is when personal information is being scraped.… More

Cybersecurity, A-Z: A is for Active Cyber Defense

(First in a continuing series.)

Active Cyber Defense, or ACD, is a broad category encompassing different kinds of actions that organizations can take to defend against breaches and cyberattacks. The operative word is “active.”  Conventional security against breaches tend to involve anti-virus software, encryption, and other perimeter defenses that act to prevent outsiders from coming in to your organization’s systems.  ACD tools are different, and involve anticipating,… More

Law360: Pokemon Go Developer Wades Into Privacy Minefield

This post originally appeared in Law360. Written by Allison Grande. Edited by Philip Shea and Brian Baresch

The rapid rise of the hit smartphone game “Pokemon Go” has opened the developer of the app up to heavy scrutiny from regulators and users, who may end up wielding a variety of privacy and consumer protection laws to address concerns over the type and quantity of data being collected.… More

Should the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act Only Apply to Acts That Are Hard to Do?

The United States District Court for the Northern District of California recently refused to dismiss a Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) claim with an unusual twist:  the defendant allegedly circumvented an IP address block after receiving a cease-and-desist letter from the plaintiff and therefore is alleged to have acted “without authorization” in violation of the CFAA.

The dispute began with Craigslist Inc.… More

New Hampshire Struggles with First Circuit Precedent on the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, Too

Originally posted on July 30th, 2013 by

            An interesting article by Jeffrey Spear that appeared in the New Hampshire Bar News in July shows that the federal district court in New Hampshire is struggling with the same question as the district court in Massachusetts: What is the proper interpretation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”)? … More

U.S. District Court Narrowly Construes Computer Fraud and Abuse Act

In the following article from Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly (reprinted with permission), Brian Bialas comments on the latest Computer Fraud and Abuse Act case, and the resultant split in the District of Massachusett on how to interpret the CFAA: 

Ex-employees sued over computer use
Judge narrowly construes CFAA

By Eric T. Berkman

A technology company could not sue former employees for downloading proprietary information onto personal storage devices before they joined a competitor without showing that the employees had physically accessed the information through fraudulent or unlawful means,… More

The Split in the Circuit Courts Over the Proper Interpretation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act Actually Goes Three Ways

Posted on March 15th, 2013 by
on our sister blog, Massachusetts Noncompete Law.
 
            I’ve written many times More about the significant split in circuit courts’ interpretation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), which affects whether an employer can sue an employee for violating computer use restrictions, usually embodied in a confidentiality agreement or company IT policy, when an employee downloads confidential information he is permitted to access but then takes that information to a competitor. …